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This bundles includes 6 sessions from the 2021 IIBEC Convention focusing on advanced technology. Each session in this bundle qualifies for 1.5 IIBEC CEH and 1.5 AIA LU/HSW.  Bundle includes the following courses: Manufactured Stone Veneer: Common Pitfalls in Design and Installation It’s Not Raining—Where is the Water Coming From? Moisture Movement in Building Enclosures Changes Coming to the 2021 IBC Requirements for Exterior Walls on Commercial Buildings Air Barrier Performance in Building Enclosures: Compliance, Continuity, and Complexity Continuous Insulation - Wall Assembly Case Study Comparisons Roof-to-Wall Connections Read More

This bundles includes 3 sessions from the 2021 IIBEC Convention focusing on restoration. Each session in this bundle qualifies for 1.5 IIBEC CEH and 1.5 AIA LU/HSW.  Bundle includes the following courses:  Ensuring Durability with Stone Restoration Techniques—Critical Decisions for Common Repairs Saddle Flashing Detailing, Mock-ups, and Construction Sequencing A Tale of Two Masonry Façade Rehabilitations: When Preservation Standards, Codes, and Client Expectations are at Odds Read More

This bundles includes 4 sessions from the 2021 IIBEC Convention focusing on roofing. Each session in this bundle qualifies for 1.5 IIBEC CEH and 1.5 AIA LU/HSW.  Bundle includes the following courses: Low-Slope Lessons from 30 Years of Hurricane Events  Saddle Flashing Detailing, Mock-ups, and Construction Sequencing Steep Slope Roofs in the Wind Roof-to-Wall Connections Read More

This bundles includes 2 sessions from the 2021 IIBEC Convention focusing on waterproofing. Each session in this bundle qualifies for 1.5 IIBEC CEH and 1.5 AIA LU/HSW.  Bundle includes the following courses: It's Not Raining - Where is the Water Coming From? Moisture Movement in Building Enclosures. Moisture Durability in Green Standards     Read More

This presentation initially took place the 2020 BES. Window wall assemblies are a popular exterior wall assembly for high-rise residential apartment buildings. These systems are economical because of efficiencies of factory assembly and rapid installation on site. With the exception of components deemed “minor”—including thermal breaks in the aluminum frames, sealants, etc.—window wall assemblies are considered non-combustible and, therefore, compliant with building code requirements to limit the vertical spread of fire. The thermal performance of window wall systems is relatively weak, limited by thermal bridging through the frames. Thermal performance can be increased with two-component, closed-cell polyurethane foam insulation spray-applied directly to the spandrels. However, the insulation is combustible and too large to be considered a minor component; so, the entire assembly is often considered to be combustible. This presentation describes full-scale fire exposure tests under CAN/ULC-S134, the equivalent to NFPA 285. The outcomes are used to assess if such walls are combustible. The paper will also consider if the test results can be applied to other window wall assemblies and to assess compliance with building codes in the United States, where Canadian window wall systems are often used. Stéphane Hoffman, PEng Morrison Hershfield Corporation | Seattle, WA With a master’s-degree-level education that combines structural engineering, building science, and architecture, Stéphane Hoffman brings a well-balanced consulting approach to the building envelope, blending scientific analysis with an understanding of aesthetics considerations. He is particularly adept at providing innovative design concepts and construction alternatives that provide value by improving durability and increasing energy efficiency. As a key technical leader at Morrison Hershfield, Hoffman has worked on projects throughout North America. He leads the company’s Building Science Analytics Group, combining façade engineering, energy modeling, and enclosure component modeling to assist teams in designing high-performance buildings. Read More

This topic was initially presented at the 2020 Virtual Convention. Although stucco has been in use for centuries, standards regarding its design and application were not developed until the early part of the twentieth century. Over time, these standards have been modified in response to changing needs, developments, and expectations within the industry. Revisions to stucco-related ASTM standards have accelerated over the past ten years in particular, changing the standards drastically. This paper will summarize the most significant of these changes and discuss the genesis and reasons for them. It will also examine areas of future progress on the standards anticipated over the coming decade. Patricia M. Aguirre, REWC, PE, CDT Bristow, VA Patricia Aguirre a building enclosure consultant in northern Virginia. Her work focuses on forensic field and laboratory investigations; façade and building enclosure investigations; structural inspection, analysis, and design; architectural retrofit and repair; and development of design documents and repair recommendations. Aguirre is an active member of IIBEC, serving on the REWC Exam Committee and teaching several exterior wall-related courses. She also serves on ASTM C11 Committee on Gypsum and Related Building Materials and Systems. Matthew Innocenzi, RBEC, PE Nick Innocenzi & Sons Consulting Engineering and Associates, LLC | Warrenton, VA Matthew Innocenzi is principal of his firm. He has 20 years of experience as an engineering consultant, with a focus on litigation support and expert testimony for building enclosure systems, particularly light-gauge metal framing, Portland cement stucco, brick veneer systems, steep-slope roofing materials, and waterproofing. Innocenzi is also an active member in ASTM C11 and D08 committees on Gypsum and Related Building Materials and Prepared Roofing Systems, serving as chairman and technical contact for ASTM C926, Standard Specification for Application of Portland Cement-Based Plaster and ASTM C1860, Standard Test Methods for Measurement of Tensile Strength or Bond Strength of Portland Cement-Based Plaster by Direct Tension task groups. Read More

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